Tag Archives: periodicals

Guest post: Sidney Paget and the Strand Magazine

This guest post comes from Karita Kuusisto, a PhD student at the School of English, Communication and Philosophy at Cardiff University. Her research focuses on the work of the artist and illustrator Sidney Paget and the role of the illustrator in the process of making illustrated periodicals in the late Victorian era. Her research interests include illustration, periodical press and photography in the nineteenth century.

Karita is leading a special session at the 2016 Annual Conference of the British Association of Victorian Studies, where she will showcase the work of the artist and illustrator Sidney Paget (1860-1908), concentrating on his work for the Strand Magazine. The session also gives visitors a chance to examine original copies of the magazine housed in Special Collections and Archives, and explore how the changes in the publication process affected the appearance of the illustrations throughout the years.


Sidney Paget may not be a name that many people recognise, even if they recognise the literary character who he helped to create visually: Sherlock Holmes.

While there is much debate over which illustrator contributed most to the famous detective’s appearance, there can be no doubt that one of the most influential of them all was the rendition that Sidney Paget created for the pages of the Strand Magazine.

Created by George Newnes in 1891, the Strand Magazine is well known for having been a highly entertaining and lavishly illustrated monthly publication. Assigning Paget as the illustrator of the ‘Sherlock Holmes’ stories seems to have happened by (a lucky) mistake. According to Paget’s daughter Winifred Paget, the Strand Magazine’s Art Editor, W. H. J. Boot, had actually intended to hire Sidney Paget’s brother, Walter Paget, for the job. Boot, however, had forgotten Walter Paget’s first name and addressed his letter to “Mr. Paget”, and the letter was subsequently opened by Sidney.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Boscombe Valley Mystery’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1891.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Boscombe Valley Mystery’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1891.

Sidney Paget illustrated the ‘Sherlock Holmes’ stories from their first publication in the Strand Magazine in 1891 until the publication of ‘Final Problem’ in 1893, and resumed as the illustrator of the stories in 1901 for ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ and 1903 for ‘The Return of Sherlock Holmes’.

During the time when ‘Sherlock Holmes’ stories were not published, Paget went on to illustrate many other stories by Arthur Conan Doyle (and others) for the Strand. These included ‘Rodney Stone’, which was first published as a serialized novel in 1896 and later published as an illustrated novel, using Paget’s illustrations.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Rodney Stone’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1896.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Rodney Stone’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1896.

What do we know about Sidney Paget? According to an article published in the Strand Magazine in July 1895, Sidney Paget was ‘born on October 4th 1860, in London, fifth son of the late Robert Paget, vestry clerk of Clerkenwell’, and studied painting in Heatherley’s School of Art. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy at eighteen years of age, ‘and constantly since that time’. In his studio, Paget painted portraits and small pictures, while also illustrating books and illustrated papers, consisting of ‘chiefly war subjects of Egypt and the Soudan.’ According to the Royal Academy records, Paget became a student of the Academy on December 6 1881, at the age of 20, as a painter. At the time, training lasted for six years.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Final Problem’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1893.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Final Problem’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1893.

Paget, being a portrait painter, often included “portraits” of characters from the stories as illustrations. His skill as an illustrator lay in his ability to make the different characters easily recognizable for the reader, something too often lacking in Victorian era illustration.

Paget’s original black-and-white drawings are painterly in their style and use of shading, which does not always translate to the finished illustrations on the Strand Magazine’s pages. This is simply due to the printing process of the illustrations: after Paget had finished the original drawing, both engraver and printer would work on the image as well, leaving their mark on the work. The printing process also affected the amount of detail that could be included in the finished illustration, which Paget would have needed to take into account when producing the drawings.

There is a clear change in the style and the overall look of the finished ‘Sherlock Holmes’ illustrations in the Strand Magazine in the year 1892. According to Alex Werner, this change happened when Paul Naumann became the engraver of the ‘Holmes’ illustrations. It is possible that the Strand Magazine was not satisfied with the quality of the previous illustrations, and wished therefore to change engravers. As the Strand Magazine’s records have been lost, it is quite impossible to know exactly why the change happened. After the changing engravers, the compositions and topics of the illustrations also became more varied, resulting in a more enjoyable reading experience.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Abbey Grange’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1904.

Illustration by Sidney Paget for Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Abbey Grange’, published in the Strand Magazine in 1904.

 

Publications consulted:

Newnes, George ‘Artists of the Strand Magazine’ in Strand Magazine 1895.2.

Paget, Winifred ‘The Artist Who Made Holmes Real’ in A Sherlock Holmes Compendium, ed. Peter Haining (London: W.H. Allen, 1980), pp. 41-45

Werner, Alex, ‘Sherlock Holmes, Sidney Paget and the Strand Magazine’ in Sherlock Holmes: The Man Who Never Lived and Will Never Die, ed. Alex Werner (London: Ebury, 2014)

Guest post: CUROP Research Project – Pattern and the Romantic Imagination, 1780-1840

This guest post comes from Felicity Holmes-Mackie. A graduate of Cardiff University, Felicity has been working as a research assistant for Dr Jane Moore School of English, Communication and Philosophy on a CUROP (Cardiff Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme) project using ladies’ periodicals held in Special Collections and Archives.

Posters from all the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences CUROP projects undertaken this year will be exhibited later this week on Friday 16th October in the Viriamu Jones Gallery in Main Building between 12.00-13.30.


‘The fashionable colours for this month are…’

dress 2During my undergraduate degree at Cardiff I have been fortunate enough to enrol on several modules taught in conjunction with Special Collections and Archives. Having been exposed to the wonderland of exciting resources nestled underneath the Arts and Social Studies Library, I naturally leapt at the chance to embark upon a research project based there during summer 2015. Now, thanks to a project led by Dr Jane Moore and supported by the Cardiff Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (CUROP), I have spent a summer picking my way through the moveable shelving and examining the treasures I discovered.

The project, entitled Pattern and the Romantic Imagination: the creative interchange between poetry and needlework 1780-1840, explores the links between material crafts and imaginative poetry and prose fiction of the Romantic period. I have been, slowly but surely, rifling through the hard copy collections and online digital databases of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century
spinesperiodicals. The main publications I have focussed on are The Ladys Magazine, La Belle Assemblée, and The Ladies’ Monthly Museum, which feature a wide range of articles. These include serialised prose fiction, illustrated biographies, recipes for medicines, word puzzles, and needlework patterns. They were generally aimed at upper class ladies and contain work written by both male and female contributors, who were often unpaid.

dressThe most interesting discoveries of the project were undoubtedly those found in the fashion descriptions which feature in all three publications. Each magazine had a slightly different approach to reporting on the latest fashions; while some articles aim to inspire with vivid descriptions, others dictate what the reader should or should not be wearing according to the tastes that month. La Belle Assemblée outlines upcoming fashions, whereas The Ladies’ Monthly Museum describes fashions of the past month in its regular feature ‘The Mirror for Fashion’. The Ladys Magazine includes similar monthly features, but twice a year it also provides vivid and detailed descriptions of the court dresses worn on royal birthdays. In these pieces, each lady’s outfit is described and judged in terms of taste; sometimes the line between gossip and fashion description becomes somewhat blurred!

detailThese fashion articles can seem repetitive and uninteresting, perhaps something to skim quickly before finding the next instalment of a gripping serialised novel or the next letter in a stream of huffy correspondence. However, delving into these articles reveals an arsenal of technical language and a veritable rainbow of descriptive vocabulary. One of the highlights of the project has undoubtedly been the rich, varied, and occasionally eccentric colour vocabulary which features in all the publications to some degree. From pigeon’s breast to faded dove, marshmallow-blossom to date-leaf, ponceau to ethereal blue, the ‘fashionable colours for the month’ are rich, varied, and occasionally eccentric.

dress3The coloured fashion plates too, are a real treat. The majority of plates show ladies sitting or standing in ways which will show off their outfits, but some also show ladies dancing, at the beach, playing musical instruments, or picking flowers. In some months hat fashions go into overdrive and resemble crowns, large turban-style wraps, or even Roman helmets.

These fashion articles and plates are certainly more stimulating and imaginative than they might first appear. Not only did the colour vocabularies surprise me but the technical descriptions of the dresses offered an insight into thinking about outfits and dress which was peculiar to the period and is far-removed from the way we think about style today. The periodicals generally offered a range of unexpected and fascinating articles and illustrations and I certainly feel lucky to have familiarised myself with them.

First World War resource guide launched

Special Collections and Archives has launched its new Resource Guide for the First World War era.

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While the library’s circulating book collections relating to the First World War cover about 10 shelves, in Special Collections and Archives we have another 10 shelf metres of contemporaneous reference sources: printed, ephemeral, and archival material produced in the period 1914-1920.

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So far this is an untapped resource by students, and most academic staff, and we’re keen to promote this material for both undergraduate and postgraduate work. We estimate we have over 3,000 items in the Library’s collections from the period 1914-1920; we have selected around 700 for the guide which are focused on the War itself.

The 1914-1920 material outlined by the Resource Guide includes –

  • Eye witness accounts from the front line,
  • War poets and literary writings, especially the huge Edward Thomas archive,
  • Wide ranging political debates raging during the war,
  • Much League of Nations material, from early in the war to well after 1920,
  • Pro-war and Conscientious objectors’ perspectives,
  • Extensive press cuttings collections throughout the war years, giving a week by week, blow by blow account from the war’s start to its end
  • Pictorial and illustration sources from a wide range of printed material,
  • Many sources showing what life was like on the ‘home front’ during the war period.

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Hopefully, from these original and contemporaneous sources, students will get an enhanced perspective on the War, getting a flavour from contemporary sources of how people thought, felt, and reacted in that difficult time.

Special Collections and Archives staff received extensive help from a volunteer, an American librarian in Cardiff, to produce the eventual guide, and we are grateful to Katherine Wilkins for her assistance.

The Resource Guide features on the Imperial War Museum’s guide to events, exhibitions, projects and activities. Find out more at www.1914.org.

Exhibition: Patagonia: Y Wladfa @ 150 (1865-2015)

Yn 2015 bydd Patagonia a Chymru yn dathlu 150 o flynyddoedd ers sefydlu’r Wladfa.  Sefydlwyd y Wladfa yn 1865, pan hwyliodd dros 150  bobl o wahanol rannau o Gymru ar y llong  ‘Mimosa’, ac ymsefydlu yn Nyffryn Camwy, Patagonia, yn Ne’r Ariannin. Mae’r gymuned Gymraeg yn parhau yno heddiw, yn ogystal â’r cysylltiadau sy’n bodoli o hyd rhwng Cymru a Phatagonia.

In 2015 Wales and Patagonia will be celebrating 150 years since the foundation of the Wladfa (colony). The Wladfa was established in 1865, when over 150 people from different parts of Wales sailed on the ship ‘Mimosa’, and settled in the Camwy Valley, Patagonia, in southern Argentina. The Welsh speaking community continues there today, as well as the contacts which exist still between Wales and Patagonia.

 

1/ Cefndir i’r Mudo / Migration Background 

Ceisiodd y Cymry sefydlu cymunedau tramor sawl gwaith, am sawl rheswm – economaidd, crefyddol, ieithyddol –  ond roedd pob un yn fethiant dros amser.

The Welsh attempted to establish communities overseas on several occasions, for several reasons – economic, religious, or linguistic – but each failed over time.

William Vaughan Sir. The golden fleece ... transported from Cambrioll Colchos, out of the southermost part of the iland, commonly called the Newfoundland. London : Printed for Francis Williams, 1626.

William Vaughan Sir. The golden fleece … transported from Cambrioll Colchos, out of the southermost part of the iland, commonly called the Newfoundland. London : Printed for Francis Williams, 1626.

Methodd cymuned William Vaughan, ‘Cambriol’, yn Newfoundland, rhywbryd ar ôl 1630.

William Vaughan and his colony ‘Cambriol’, in Newfoundland, failed sometime after 1630.

 

2/ Teithio ac Ymsefydlu, 19 ganrif / Travel and Settlement, 19th century

Mae hanes y fordaith ar y llong Mimosa wedi arwain at nifer o gyhoeddiadau ar y pwnc, a’r caledi a wynebodd y Cymry, a ffyniant y gymuned wedyn, eto wedi ysgogi nifer i ysgrifennu am y digwyddiadau yno. Cychwynodd popetMDJonesh gan erthygl Michael D. Jones yn 1848.

The history of the sea journey on the ship Mimosa led to many publications on the topic, and the hardships faced by the Welsh, and the success of the community afterwards, again inspired many to write about events there.  Everything started with an article by Michael D. Jones in 1848.

Gwladychfa

 

 

Gwladychfa2

 

3/  Y Wladfa, 20 ganrif (cynnar) / 20th century (early)

O ddiwedd y 19 ganrif roedd llywodraeth yr Ariannin yn elyniaethus tuag at y gymuned Gymraeg, a dirywiodd gweithgareddau’n araf, ac nid oedd mudwyr newydd o Gymru ar ôl 1913.

From the end of the 19th century the Argentine government had an unfriendly attitude towards the Welsh community, and activities declined slowly, while the last migration from Wales came in 1913.

Trelew

 

4/ Y Wladfa, 20 ganrif (adfywiad) / 20th century (revival)

Sbardunodd canmlwyddiant sefydlu’r Wladfa, yn 1965, nifer o unigolion i ail-afael yn y cysylltiad rhwng Cymru a Phatagonia, a thyfodd amrywiaeth o gysylltiadau newydd, yn cynnwys cefnogaeth i’r gymuned Gymraeg oddi wrth Gynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru yn 1999.

The centenary of the founding of the Wladfa, in 1965, spurred a number of individuals to re-start connections between Wales and Patagonia, and a variety of new connections developed, including support for the Welsh community there from the National Assembly for Wales in 1999.

Eluned

 

5/ Patagonia, Llen Teithio / Travel Writing

Ers y 1960au mae ffrwd gyson o lyfrau teithio am Batagonia wedi llifo o’r gweisg, pob un yn nodi’r gymuned Cymraeg yno, efallai’r mwyaf enwog (ond nid y mwyaf cywir) oedd y llyfr gan Bruce Chatwin.

Since the 1960s a stream of travel books about Patagonia has flowed from publishers, each one covering the Welsh community there, possibly the most well known (but not the most accurate) was the book by Bruce Chatwin.

Ysgol 

Ystadegaeth

 

6/ Y Wladfa, 21 ganrif / 21st century

Prifysgol Caerdydd a’r Wladfa / Cardiff University and the Wladfa

Iaith, diwylliant, hanes, cyhoeddiadau, cysylltiadau â Chymru, etc.

Language, culture, history, publications, contacts with Wales, etc.

CUlinks

 

Full list of sources featured in the exhibition:

1/ Cefndir i’r Mudo / Migration Background 

Hanes mor-daith y Brig Albion, Aberteifi, (Llywelyn Davies, Llywydd) gydâ Mûdolion (Emigrants,) &c. o Gaernarfon i Ogledd America : ynghyd â rhai ymddiddanion ar y daith, ac ychydig gasgliad o hanes am y wlad. Caernarfon : argraphwyd gan Peter Evans, 1820.

R Gorst;  David Lloyd.   Desgrifiad o diriogaeth Wisconsin …  yn mharthau gorllewinol Unol Daleithiau America. British Temperance Emigration Society; Cymdeithas Ymfudol Gymedrol Frytanaidd.; Welsh Emigratory Society of Britain.  Bangor … Bethesda, 1845.

Samuel Roberts.  Pregethau a darlithiau. Utica, E.N. : argraffwyd gan T.J. Griffiths, 1865.

2/ Teithio ac Ymsefydlu, 19 ganrif / Travel and Settlement, 19th century

Abraham Matthews. Hanes y Wladfa Gymreig yn Patagonia. Aberdar : Mills ac Evans, pr.|1894

D. Davies. Attodiad i’r Cymro : sef Llawlyfr y Wladfa Gymreig, Patagonia. Caergybi. O.P. Griffith,1882.

Hugh Hughes (Cadvan Gwynedd). Llawlyfr y wladychfa Gymreig yn cynwys sylwadau ar yr angenrheidrwydd a’r posiblrwydd o’i sefydlu, hanes Patagonia, yn egluro ei haddasrwydd i’r sefydliad…yn ngayda darlunlen o Patagonia.  Llynlleifiad: L. Jones & Co., 1862.

Patagonia, yn egluro ei haddasrwydd i’r sefydliad…yn ngayda darlunlen o Patagonia. Llynlleifiad : L. Jones & Co., 1862.

Susan Wilkinson. Mimosa’s voyages : official logs, crew lists and masters. Talybont, Ceredigion : Y Lolfa,2007.

Lewis Jones.  Cymru newydd : hanes y Wladva Gymreig ; tiriogaeth Chubut, yn y weriniaeth Arianin, De Amerig. Caernarvon : Cwmni’r Wasg Genedlaethol Gymreig, 1898.

Joseph Seth Jones; Elvey MacDonald.  Dyddiadur Mimosa : El diario del Mimosa. Aberystwyth : Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru; Llanrwst: Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, 2002.

D.S. Davies.  Adroddiad am sefyllfa y Wladfa Gymreig, allan o “Baner America”. Bala : H. Evans, pr.|1875?

Lewis Jones. Ymfudiaeth y Cymry.  Bangor : Hughes, pr.,1885.

Jonathan Ceredig Davies. Adventures in the land of giants. Lampeter, Welsh Press Company, 1892.

Y Cenhadwr Americanaidd : Remsen, N.Y. : argraffwyd gan J.R. Everett, 1840-1901. [1844 erthygl gan M.D. Jones, ‘Gwladychfa Gymreig’].

 

3/ Y Wladfa, 20 ganrif (cynnar) / 20th century (early)

R. Williams. Cymry Patagonia. Aberystwyth : Gwasg Aberystwyth,1942.

Jonathan Ceredig Davies. Adventures in the land of giants.Lampeter : Welsh Press Company, 1892.

Eluned Morgan. Dringo’r Andes. Y Fenni : Owen, 1904.

Eluned Morgan.  Ar dir a môr. Y Fenni : Gwasg Minerv, 1913.

Eluned Morgan.  Gwymon y Mor. Y Fenni, Owen, 1909.

R. Williams . Rhyddiaith y Wladfa. Dinbych : Gwasg Gee, 1949.

R.B. Williams.  Eluned Morgan. J.D.Lewis, 1948.

Evans, L.   Adlais y  Gamwy…detholiad … o’r Wladfa Gymreig.  Caernarfon, 1924.

Morgan, E.  Plant yr Haul.  Evans a Williams.  1915.

 

4/ Y Wladfa, 20 ganrif (adfywiad) / 20th century (revival)

R. Williams. Gwladfa Patagonia : the Welsh colony in Patagonia, 1865-1965. Caerdydd : Gwasg Prifysgol Cymru, 1965.

Gareth Alban Davies,  Kyffin Williams.  Tan tro nesaf : darlun o wladfa Gymreig Patagonia. 1918-2006. Llandysul : Gwasg Gome, 1976.

Geraint Dyfnallt Owen.  Crisis in Chubut : a chapter in the history of the Welsh colony in Patagonia.Swansea : C. Davies,1977.

Glyn Williams. The desert and the dream : a study of Welsh colonization in Chubut, 1865-1915. Cardiff : University of Wales Pres, 1975.

Ioan Roberts. Rhyfel ni : profiadau Cymreig o ddwy ochr Rhyfel y Falklands/Malvinas 1982.

Llanrwst : Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, 2003.

Catrin Williams.  Er Serchog Gof … Gwasg Gee,  1997.

 

5/ Patagonia: Llen Teithio / Travel Writing

Ioan Roberts.  Rhyfel ni : profiadau Cymreig o ddwy ochr Rhyfel y Falklands/Malvinas 1982.  Llanrwst:  Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, 2003.

Jon Gower.  Gwalia Patagonia.  Llandysul: Gomer, 2015.

Cathrin Williams.  Y Wladfa yn dy boced : [llyfr taith i’r Wladfa]. Caernarfon : Gwasg y Bwthyn, 2007, 3ydd arg.

Bruce Chatwin, Paul Theroux.  Patagonia revisited ( illustrated by Kyffin Williams).  London : Jonathan Cape,1992.

Bruce Chatwin.  In Patagonia.  London : Vintage, 1998 [2005 New edition]

R. Williams . Crwydro Patagonia. Llandybie : Llyfrau’r Dryw, 1960.

 

6/ Y Wladfa, 21 ganrif / 21st century

Prifysgol Caerdydd a’r Wladfa  /   Cardiff University and the Wladfa

Elvey MacDonald.  Cymdeithas Cymru-Ariannin : 1939-2014. Penrhyn-coch, Aberystwyth: Cymdeithas Cymru-Ariannin, 2014.

Edi Dorian Jones. Capillas galesas en Chubut. Chubut Argentina : Edición del Autor, 2000.

Galeses y Tehuelches : historia de un encuentro en Patagonia = The Welsh and Tehuelches : a meeting of peoples in Patagonia = Y Cymre a’r Tehuelches : cenhedloedd yn cwrdd ym Mhatagonia.  Chubut (Argentina). Secretaria de Cultura. Chubut : Provincia del Chubut;2007.

Una Frontera Lejana, la colonizacion galesa del Chubut…1865 – 1935. Fundacion Antorchas, 2003.

Other periodical sources

Y Ddraig goch : cylchgrawn misol at wasanaeth y Wladfa Gymreig. Bala : argraffedig gan H. Evans|1876-1877

Ein Breiniad. Patagonia : s.n.|1878-1883

Y Drafod : El mentor. Gaiman, Chubut : Diario El Cordillerano S.R.L.|1891-

Y Gwyliedydd : newyddiadur wythnosol annibynnol. Trelew : s.n.|1929-1938

Government reports on the Wladfa for 1867, 1871, 1872, 1876, 1897, 1900, 1902

Exhibition: Should women wear trousers?

Special Collections and Archives’ latest exhibition is curated by Dr Becky Munford and Amber Jenkins, School of English, Communication and Philosophy. The exhibition forms part of Becky’s wider research project into trouser wearing among women in Britain, France and America since the French Revolution. Becky’s website, ‘Women in Trousers: A Visual Archive’, will be launched later this summer.

The exhibition will be on display until early September. Extracts are supplied below.

Should women wear trousers?

From Joan of Arc to George Sand, Mary Edwards Walker to Marlene Dietrich and Colette to Coco Chanel, the history of trouser-wearing women in the West is vexed by controversy. Linked with periods of social and political upheaval, women’s liberation, radical thought, aesthetic innovation and erotic freedom, women in trousers have historically represented an illegitimate assumption of male authority and power – of ‘wearing the trousers’ – that destabilises fixed notions of sexual difference and threatens the ideology of the separate spheres.

trousers1

‘Should Women Wear Trousers?’, Picture Post (1 November 1941), pp. 22-23.

‘Trousers For Women Are Not Necessarily Unattractive’, Punch (11 May 1927), p. 517.

Dress reform and ‘rational’ costume

The ‘bloomer costume’ was popularised by the American women’s rights activist and temperance advocate Amelia Bloomer in The Lily in 1851. Consisting of loose Turkish-style ‘trowsers’ worn under a short dress, the bloomer costume offered a ‘rational’ alternative to what Bloomer described as the ‘everlasting bondage’ of stays and petticoats. Although trousers had been worn by women in utopian socialist communities earlier in the century, bloomers represented the most radical challenge to fashionable dress because they wedded dress reform to feminist thought and political protest.

bloomerism

‘Woman’s Emancipation (Being a Letter addressed to Mr. Punch, with a Drawing, by a strong-minded American Woman)’, Punch (28 June 1851), p. 3.

‘Amelia Bloomer, Originator of the New Dress’, Illustrated London News (27 September 1851), p. 396 [first printed in The Lily (September 1851), p. 69].

‘The American Ladies’ New Costume’, Illustrated London News (19 July 1851), p. 85.

‘Bloomeriana. A Dream’, Punch (1851) pp. 204-205. Illustrated London News (19 July 1851), p. 85.  

Irrational Rationalists

The intrigue and anxiety provoked by the sight of women wearing trousers in public unfolded across the printed pages of the popular press on both sides of the Atlantic. The British weekly magazine Punch focused its satire on the figure of the ‘strong-minded woman’, whose appropriation of trousers – a visual symbol of male power and privilege – was construed as a direct assault on masculinity. In the early 1850s, the magazine routinely offered derisive images of bloomer-clad women adopting ‘masculine’ poses, smoking cigars, proposing to men and terrorising their ‘hen-pecked’ husbands.

sirens

‘Bloomerism!’, Punch (1851), p. 189.

‘The Angel in ‘The House;’ Or, the Result of Female Suffrage (A Troubled Dream of the Future)’, Punch (14 June 1884), p. 279.

‘Sirens in Small-Clothes’, Lady’s Pictorial (25 April 1891), p. 654.

Free-wheeling feminism

The bloomer costume reappeared with the bicycle craze of the 1890s, and once again became the object of Punch’s caricature. The New Woman on a bicycle not only represented new locomotive freedoms for women, but also the possibility of broader social, intellectual and political freedoms. In 1896, the American women’s suffrage campaigner Susan B. Anthony declared that bicycling had done ‘more to emancipate women than anything else in the world’.

bicycle

‘The Latest Craze in Paris: Lady Cyclists as Seen at Longchamps’, The Graphic (14 April 1894), front cover.

‘Fashions for November’, The Graphic (27 October 1894), p. 495.

‘The National Cycle Show’, The Graphic (15 December 1894), p. 682.

‘The Latest Parisian Craze’, The Graphic (14 April 1894), p. 420.

‘Bicycle Suit’, Punch (12 January 1895), p. 23.

‘A Girl Goes Cycling’, Picture Post (17 February 1940), pp. 42-43.

Wearing the trousers

The early decades of the twentieth century saw dramatic transformations in women’s dress to match the seismic changes taking place in the cultural, technological and political spheres. During the First and Second World Wars women adopted trousers to take up new modes of labour, working on the land, in munitions factories, as ship-builders, and as ambulance drivers and pilots, among other professions, preparing for and responding to ‘national emergencies’.

landgirl

‘Farmers! Protect Your Crops by Using “Binks’s Patent Futurist Scarecrow”’, Punch (17 July 1918), p. 33.

‘The Farmer’s Idea of the Landgirl’, Punch (13 March 1940), n.p.

‘Ambulance Drivers in their War-Time Kit’, Picture Post (13 May 1939), p. 16.

‘Girl Pilots’, Picture Post (22 October 1938), p. 47.

Fashioning the modern woman

In the 1920s and 1930s, trousers became a more acceptable part of women’s attire for sports and leisure activities. Sportswear influenced the masculinisation of women’s fashion, while pyjama suits, and even shorts, became a part of fashionable women’s summer wardrobes. That trousers played a vital role in fashioning the idea of ‘modern’ femininity was also reflected in the association between trouser-wearing and smoking – trousers featured prominently in cigarette advertising of the period to suggest the freedoms promised by smoking for the modern woman.

fashion

‘Trousers – And All That – For Women’, Punch (18 May 1931), n.p.

‘Play Suits for Summer’, Picture Post (1 April 1939), pp. 52-53.

‘Advertisement for Camels’, Harper’s Magazine (July 1930), back cover.

Enhancements to Special Collections and Archives, Summer 2013

To continue to accommodate and preserve our growing research collections, a programme of refurbishment work is planned to take place during the summer.

The work involves the installation of new compact mobile shelving in the main research area, located on the lower ground floor of the Arts and Social Studies Library. The new shelving will increase capacity significantly, creating more space for further historical and rare materials.

The work is planned to start from Monday 10th June and will continue until late September.

To make our collections as accessible as possible during this time, the History Research Collection will be moved to the top floor of the Arts and Social Studies Library for open access consultation.

Other works, including the 19th Century Periodicals and Salisbury Library Collection, will be accessible by Special Collections and Archives staff only. By prior appointment, staff will be able to retrieve items from these collections for consultation. Appointments should be made with a minimum of three days’ notice.

Peter Keelan, Head of Special Collections and Archives, said: “These developments will be of great benefit to our students, staff and researchers. The increased space will mean that we will be able to house further collections, enabling our visitors to more easily access and study a wider range of our rare, specialist, unique, and historical sources.”

Further work is also planned to improve the reading areas, and to provide a larger, better-equipped seminar room for classes and events.

If you have any questions or comments about the work, or would like to arrange an appointment to view collections during the refurbishment period, please contact Peter Keelan – email KeelanP@cardiff.ac.uk or telephone 029 2087 5678.

Hidden killers of the Victorian home

corsetTonight’s BBC4 documentary, Hidden Killers of the Victorian Home (10pm) reveals just how many ‘innovative’ domestic products and gadgets harboured deadly poisons and diseases.

Researchers from Modern TV spent several days  in Special Collections and Archives consulting illustrated Victorian periodicals, gathering stills for the documentary. Many useful images, often adverts, were found in Punch, the Illustrated London News, The Graphic, and magazines aimed at the Victorian housewife, such as The Sketch, The Queen, and Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine. Over 1000 images were gathered in the research process.

The documentary explores the presence of arsenic in Victorian wallpaper, lead in toys’ paint, the unsafe use of gas and electricity, and unsterilised babies’ feeding bottles. It also explores the detrimental effect that the introduction of metal eyelets had on corsetry. The eyelets allowed women’s corsets to be pulled even tighter in the indulgence of fashion, causing considerable damage to the back and internal organs, and increased the risk of miscarriage, as many women continued to wear restrictive corsets throughout pregnancy.

Hidden Killers of the Victorian Home is available on iPlayer until 11th April 2013.

Resource guide for women’s history launched for International Women’s Day

brazilSpecial Collections and Archives is marking International Women’s Day 2013 with the launch of its latest resource guide on women’s history and gender studies. The guide covers sources from the 16th-21st centuries, including:

  • Bibliographies and reference works on British women’s history and writing;
  • Biographies of the lives of women;
  • Gendered children’s literature and comics;
  • Conduct, etiquette and advice manuals;
  • Broadsides and ballads relating to women as both victims and perpetrators of crime;
  • Memoirs, diaries and autobiographies of women;
  • Sources relating to women teachers, and girl’s eduction;
  • Journals, magazines and ballads on fashion and dress;
  • histmedHistorical works on women’s health and medical treatment, including the history of midwifery, gynaecology and obstetrics; the history of nursing as a profession; and reports of the Medical Officer for Cardiff, including data on maternity and child welfare;
  • A range of material relating to women’s lives around the world, including newspapers from Indian women’s organisations, Spanish Civil War sources related to women, sources relating to women in Australia, European Union and United Nations reports on women, and papers of female slavery abolitionists;
  • A wide range of women’s journals and magazines, from society pages to radical suffragette publications;
  • Literary works by women, including the papers of Ann Griffiths (poet), Joan Reeder (journalist), Maria Edgeworth (novelist), Felicia Hemans (poet), Mary Tighe (poet), and Lady Sidney Morgan (novelist). Information on female applicants to the Royal Literary Fund, and women writers published by Longmans;
  • Musical scores and archives from Morfydd Llwyn Owen (1891-1918), Grace Williams (1906-1977), and Nancy Storace (1765-1817);
  • Press cuttings from late 20th century Welsh newspapers on women’s issues;
  • girlgraduatePolitical papers from the British Labour Party and Newport Labour Party on women’s issues; papers of the Labour MPs Ellen Wilkinson and Marion Phillips; the diary of social reformer Beatrice Webb; archives of the Women’s Labour League, journals by Sylvia Pankhurst, and a range of suffragette magazines;
  • Books by and archives belonging to female travellers;
  • Papers relating to the history of female students at Cardiff University and its predecessors;
  • Sources on witchcraft and those accused of its practice (commonly women), in Europe and America;
  • Sources on women’s societies

Lunchtime workshops: women’s history and gender studies

Special Collections and Archives’ series of lunchtime workshops continues in December with sessions on women’s history and gender studies sources. The workshops are intended to raise awareness of the breadth of material available to support research in this area, and as a general introduction to using Special Collections and Archives.

The second workshop on women’s history sources will be led by Assistant Archivist, Alison Harvey. Topics will include: biography; children’s literature; conduct/advice manuals; crime; diaries and autobiographies; education; fashion; health and medicine; international affairs; journals and magazines; literature and journalism; music; newspapers; politics, suffrage and the labour movement; travel; University history; witchcraft; and women’s societies.

Workshops will be held in Special Collections and Archives, on the lower ground floor of the Arts and Social Studies Library, Corbett Road, Cardiff. The women’s history workshop is scheduled for 12-1pm on Thursday 6 December, and will be repeated at 1-2pm on Friday 7 December.

Workshops are open to all, but places are limited, so if you would like to attend either session, please email HarveyAE@cf.ac.uk, stating your preferred time.

New for 2012/13: SCOLAR Lunchtime Workshops

This year, SCOLAR is offering a pilot series of lunchtime workshops on subjects relevant to a range of disciplines. Workshops on illustrated sources and women’s studies will run this autumn, with sessions on historical travel literature and World War One sources in the spring. The workshops are intended to raise awareness of the breadth of material available to support research in these areas, and as a general introduction to using Special Collections and Archives.

The first workshop on illustrated sources will be led by Assistant Archivist, Alison Harvey. It will introduce a range of illustrated material from the SCOLAR collections, including literary, scientific, medical, and women’s periodicals and miscellanies, newspapers, children’s literature, art and architecture, novel, plays and poetry, travel literature, ballads and almanacs, and prints, posters and propaganda.

Workshops will be held in Special Collections and Archives, on the lower ground floor of the Arts and Social Studies Library, Corbett Road, Cardiff. The illustrated sources workshop is scheduled for 12-1pm on 22 November, and will be repeated at 1-2pm on 23 November. Places are limited, so if you would like to attend either session, please email HarveyAE@cf.ac.uk, stating your preferred time.

Download a copy of the workshop poster